Natural Easter egg painting

Dyeing Easter eggs? Naturally!

Easter is just around the corner. Even if this year everything is a little different than usual, many are already looking forward to the traditional egg dyeing. Here, children and parents come together and can give free rein to their creativity in dyeing and decorating. But why always buy the finished Easter egg dye from the supermarket, if there is another way?

We have a creative solution for the holidays: Natural egg dyeing with food and plants. This is exactly what we have always wanted to try. And since unusual times can also be an occasion to get to know “new things”, we want to introduce you to the most popular sustainable alternatives and encourage you to experiment.

Natural Easter egg dyeing - HALFAR®

The colours of nature

On the right we have prepared an overview of the most common “natural colorants”. Below we explain what you have to consider in order to achieve the desired colour shades. Before cooking it is recommended to clean the eggs with vinegar water. This will help them to take on the desired colour better afterwards.

The following descriptions refer to the hot dyeing method. Following the described procedures, the colour solution can be filtered before the eggs are hard boiled in it.

All colour variations can be achieved not only in a hot brew, but also in a cooled one that has drawn enough before. So even the little ones do not burn their fingers. For this purpose, the eggs are precooked as usual before dyeing them, and then left in the dye until the desired colour is achieved.

Golden yellow with turmeric

Anyone who has ever used (fresh) turmeric knows how difficult it is to remove the coloured stains everywhere afterwards. This is exactly the reason why it is ideal for dyeing Easter eggs golden yellow. To do this, cut fresh, peeled turmeric into pieces and boil it for about 1-2 hours in plenty of hot water. If you can’t find fresh turmeric, you can also try the powder, which also colours well.

Red to brown with onion skins and coffee

Probably the best known dyeing technique is the use of onion skins. These were used long before the use of artificially produced egg dye. To do this, let about 2 handfuls of onion skins soak in 1-2 litres of boiling water for a few minutes. Coffee can also be used for brown tones. Take about 50 g of ground coffee and boil it for max. 30 minutes.

Intense red with beetroot

Beetroot has a similar colouring effect on all kinds of rootstocks as turmeric. Barely touched, the red colour does not get off your fingers as quickly. Ideal for dyeing eggs! Here too, the red root is precooked in just under 1 litre of water for about 15 minutes.

Green tones with parsley, spinach and nettle

Theoretically, all green, non-toxic plants can produce a wide variety of shades of green. However, not every plant achieves the same colour intensity. Parsley, spinach and stinging nettle are particularly popular for egg dyeing. To do this, cook a bunch of the desired plant in 1 litre of hot water for about 30 minutes.

Blue tones with red cabbage and blueberries

Since there are many different shades of blue, there are also several ways to achieve a blue tone. Popular ingredients are red cabbage and blueberries, e.g. from the freezer. Take about 1 cup of each and boil them in 1-2 litres of water for up to an hour, depending on the desired shade.

Of course you can also experiment with other foods and (non-toxic!) plants yourself and possibly get new shades. There are no limits to your creativity!

Decorate naturally beautiful? No problem!

You don’t have any stickers or glitter pens in the house to put the finishing touches to your Easter eggs? No problem – there are also numerous sustainable ideas.

How about discreet leaf motifs, for example? You can get these if, for example, parsley is placed on the eggs. Then the eggs can be safely positioned in a nylon stocking or a thin net and boiled or dyed as described above.

Decoration for natural Easter eggs

Another possibility is the rice method. For this you can put the egg for example in an old washed-out yoghurt cup, add a few grains of rice and a little of the colour you made yourself. Close the lid, shake well – and you have a nice speckled pattern.

In addition to these two suggestions, there are many more ideas on how to decorate your Easter eggs.

And now have fun trying it out!

Now we wish you a lot of fun while experimenting. If you like, you can send us a picture of your artwork to social@halfar.com. We are looking forward to your ideas and wish you a wonderful Easter already now!

P.S.: If you are still looking for a card for your Easter greetings, we have also prepared something in DIY style. Have a look now and send greetings!

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